GETTING PLAYED: Second Symposium on Equity in the Entertainment Industry

Posted on Posted in Blog

Featured in Huffington Post Entertainment, festival director and programmer Adrienne M. Anderson served as a panelist at the Second Symposium on Equity in the Entertainment Industry at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA. Organized by filmmaker and lawyer Dr. Kathleen A. Tarr, the symposium included panelists from SAG-AFTRA, authors, actors, attorneys, activists, new Faculty Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), and professors.

The day before the Oscars on February 27, 2016, the public was invited to join experts from the fields of entertainment, psychology, education, law, and social justice for Getting Played, the Second Annual Symposium on Equity in the Entertainment Industry and Awards. The Keynote Address was delivered by Amy Pietz (“Caroline in the City”) with Closing Remarks by Dr. Adam Banks (Director, Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), Stanford University). Panelists included Adrienne Anderson (International Black Women’s Film Festival), Guy Aoki (Media Action Network for Asian Americans), Fontana Butterfield (Yeah, I Said Feminist), Marissa Lee (Racebending.com), Michael Mohammed (San Francisco Conservatory of Music), Adam Moore (SAG-AFTRA), Charlotte Tate (Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University), and Adam Tobin (Film & Media Studies Program, Department of Art & Art History, Stanford University).

Moderated by PWR Lecturer Kathleen Tarr, Getting Played is based upon her 2010 feature length documentary of the same name, both the Symposium and the film explore inequitable treatment in the Industry from acting and directing to writing and producing. To honor individuals who contribute to Industry equity in their day to day lives, the Symposium concluded with the presentation of awards that recognized important but typically under-celebrated contributions. Previous recipients have refused to audition as stereotypes, refused to rewrite scripts to create White leads, limited exposure to inequitable productions by, e.g., not watching certain television shows, and created opportunities for underrepresented Industry workers to share their projects and creativity with larger audiences.

2016 Symposium awardees were Maria Giese (director/screenwriter), Natalie Leonard (attorney, State Bar of California), Roger Tang (producer/playwright), and Karen Zacarías (playwright) with one special award announced at the event.

Special Remarks included Stanford professor and actor Dr. Myrton Running Wolf (“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” “The New World”).